HOW CYCLING MAKES YOU YOUNGER

68 year young cyclist Col. Rajesh Dutta from Delhi



Exercises like cycling can hold back the effects of ageing and keep people young in profound ways, a new study has found.

Activities like regularly riding a Hybrid city bike appear to undo the assumption that we get more frail as we get older, the authors of the new research claim.

The studies compared data on amateur cyclists with healthy adults that did not regularly exercise. It found that those who were exercising seemed to be preserving many parts of their health.

48 year young rider Preeti Wadhwa mother of two kids and software Devloper in Noida




The findings showed that the cyclists preserved muscle mass and strength with age, while maintaining stable levels of body fat and cholesterol. In men, testosterone levels remained high.

More surprisingly, the anti-ageing effects of cycling appeared to extend to the immune system.

57 year young rider Mr. Pramod Bharadwaj who always cheer his community Greater Noida Fitness Freak every Morning



Cycling can hold back the effects of ageing and rejuvenate the immune system, a study has found.

Scientists carried out tests on 125 amateur cyclists aged 55 to 79 and compared them with healthy adults from a wide age group who did not exercise regularly.


The findings, outlined in two papers in the journal Aging Cell, showed that the cyclists preserved muscle mass and strength with age while maintaining stable levels of body fat and cholesterol. In men, testosterone levels remained high.

More surprisingly, the anti-ageing effects of cycling appeared to extend to the immune system.
Source: www.theguardian.com

young riders of tamil Nadu



An organ called the thymus, which makes immune cells called T-cells normally starts to shrink from the age of 20. But the thymuses of older cyclists were found to be generating as many T-cells as those of young individuals.

Institute of Inflammation and Ageing at the University of Birmingham, said: "Hippocrates in 400 BC said that exercise is man's best medicine, but his message has been lost over time, and we are an increasingly sedentary society.

Have you ever thought that cycling could be making you younger? Think about it. Perhaps your riding is helping you beat the clock, holding back the years and giving you a chronological advantage. But on the other hand, if you don’t treat yourself well, cycling could be adding a few years to your real age.

Age is just a number, plank competion



So try to be honest. Do you look, feel, act and think your age? What would the people around you say? There is good chance others might have a different answer to your own.

Our ageing is not just a result of what we do, there’s also a significant genetic component. For example, skin type, varicose veins or rate of hair loss are just three ways in which heredity will help to determine the hand that is dealt you.

young National team of track cycling



How often have you heard it said that a person looks like their mother, father or grandparents? We might be unique individuals but our genetic building blocks will often closely match those of our parents. To counter the argument that we are bound to turn into our parents and therefore age as they did, we must consider both sides of the nature-nurture paradigm. Although genetics give us the building blocks, we can do much to make positive – or negative – choices that will affect our health and fitness and thus our rate of ageing.

Few smokers, excessive sun worshippers or totally sedentary people look good for their age. Their lifestyle choices tend to make them age more quickly than non-smoking, active people who slap on the suntan lotion. The person who smokes 60 a day and lives to 90 is a rarity, far outnumbered by those who have ill health and poor cardio-respiratory systems, and look to have prematurely aged.

no matter how old are you, no one can steal your happiness of cycling



In other words, what you do – the nurture – can make big differences to the genetic nature you start life with.

A good or bad hand

You may or may not have good ageing genetics, but as with those genes that affect your fitness, taking the right actions almost always has a positive effect. How you age can show how much you do or don’t care for your body. Obvious ways to make yourself look, feel and perform older than you actually are include weight gain, excessive UV damage to the skin, lack of exercise and a poor diet.

Nurture with Nature and make your self young always



As a cyclist, you’re not sedentary, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that you look good for your age. It could be that you are just starting out as a rider or that you are only recently getting back into the two-wheeled world. Or it might be that you’re a long-time rider but that you’ve not got your weight under control. It’s clear that many active people still fight weight as one of their primary demons. And if you stop riding, the demon will catch you.


You might have genetics that are very good at storing fat. If so, it’s easy to blame your make-up and get yourself into a mindset where you accept that there’s nothing you can do about it. But in fact it’s nearly always possible to make yourself leaner, stronger or fitter.


NATURE AND NURTURE:

Do not not limit yourself because of your age



The rest of your life starts now. Today. The take away message from this article is quite simple: you do have the power to slow down the ageing process, and to use cycling as a means towards this end. How fast you’re ageing is a see-saw effect of nature and nurture. You must control the nature with how you nurture your body. Start right now by doing the reality check – do you look, feel, act and think your age? Write this in your diary, or as a Post-It reminder; don’t just think it – write it down and acknowledge the truth. Good or bad.

I hope this article will help you to make yourself motivated to keep riding but as always if you have any questions, queries or advice please let us know, Our team will love to get back to you and happy to help.

MEANWHILE, RIDE HARD & RIDE SAFE.

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